Preparing Children to Return to School Part 5 – A Social Approach | Gentle East Martial Arts
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I've tried a bunch of martial arts over the years, but it wasn't until I got to Gentle East that I realized that the art itself doesn't matter so much--it's the attitude of its practitioners. These people aren't learning and teaching how to kill, but how to live. How to live despite trauma and illness, and to keep practicing their art even if it's just in their hearts. The tenets are courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control, and indomitable spirit, and they mean every word. They teach the kids that other dojangs won't. Autistic, physically challenged, special needs, you name it. They're fully engaged with the messy business of life. A whole lot of families are glad that Master Barbara Robinson followed her vision. Ours is one.

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Preparing Children to Return to School Part 5 – A Social Approach

Over the past few months, our inter-personal interactions have been minimal, and our social skills might be rusty. Additionally, prolonged school closures have had a negative impact on children’s social development, and we are now challenged to help them to regain skills that have regressed while also developing new skills. Though some children will return to a brick-and-mortar school, others will virtually engage with teachers and classmates. But no matter how they attend school in the beginning, all children will return to in-person classes eventually, so we must prepare them now so they can feel confident as they re-engage with friends, classmates, and teachers when the time comes.

The extended time away from school, in conjunction with periods of isolation and the summer break, have increased feelings of uneasiness when it comes to social interactions for children. And while they may be excited about seeing their friends and teachers again, the anxiety that they are feeling may deter them from regular social interactions at the start. Some children need a refresher course in age-appropriate social interactions to help them restore or further develop their social skill set.

To help children navigate through any social anxiety and apprehension, parents can begin building their child’s social confidence again by implementing the following three steps.

1) Identify Social Concerns – Just as any new school year generally brings on a little anxiety, this year will bring about a few more. Even children who have been able to interact with extended family and some friends might be apprehensive about meeting new teachers and classmates virtually or in-person. By having an open discussion and being attuned to children’s behaviors, parents can begin identifying what children feel will be their most significant challenges about facing social situations again. Being supportive and nurturing will be important in helping them work through this.

2) Refresh Social Skills – As children have regressed in some age-appropriate social skills and have been unable to develop any new ones, parents must now help them regain momentum in their development. However, since social exchanges now require a different approach, we need to be creative with our “no-touch” greetings. Anything from air high fives, to elbow bumps, to giving a peace sign, everyone is learning a new way to interact. Children who are still developing these skills, especially younger ones that are more hands-on, will need to learn to communicate differently. As they move forward, encouragement, and reminders of age-appropriate and pandemic-appropriate social interactions are essential.

3) Role-play Social Scenarios – As children talk through their anxiety and refresh their social skills, it is vital to have them practice in a safe space. Engaging in role-playing scenarios will help children work through a new way to socialize while still asking questions when they are unsure. Simple things such as saying hi with a wave or a foot tap can be practiced, which will create consistency and instill a sense of normalcy for new ways to interact. Additionally, using this time to come up with different ways to play while socially distancing can also make children feel more confident in interactions.

At Gentle East Martial Arts we have found an effective way to help work through these three steps is by utilizing the Early Skillz Program with our younger students. This fun, game-based approach to developing the whole child creates an environment where children can interact with others their age, whether in class or virtually. Since the instructors create an entertaining and supportive environment, children feel more secure with interacting socially. In addition, the Parent SKILLZ supplemental blog posts help parents learn ways to connect and be attuned to their child’s emotions and behaviors while giving them ways to enhance the parent-child relationship so social development can flourish.

As we work through helping children regain lost social skills, it’s important to remind them that things will eventually go back to normal. But for now, engaging them in creating ways they can socialize with others is important. Remind them that they can still smile and wave, they can still talk to others, they can still play with their friends. We just have to do so at a distance.